The Daily Traveler: Museum of the Moving Image

Why the Museum of the Moving Image is the Coolest Museum Ever

From its Breaking Bad exhibit to its vintage arcade and console games, the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, Queens, is one of the coolest museums in New York City. Here's why you need to visit ASAP.

Admit it. While worrying about how the saga of Walter White will play out in its final season, you've pored over every frame of old Breaking Bad episodes, looking for clues to how it will all end. MoMI understands—and celebrates—your attention to detail. In its Breaking Bad-centric exhibition, the Museum lets you get a closer look at the props, costumes, color schemes, and other behind-the-scenes material that show White's narrative arc. "Our exhibition is all about process," says David Schwartz, the museum's chief curator. "We want to show what they do physically to bring about the transformation in Walter White."

Click through to see the full slideshow on the website of the Condé Nast Traveler.

Photo by Sam Suddaby/Museum of the Moving Image

The Daily Traveler: Classic Road Trips Slideshow

Best Drives: Iconic American Road Trips Worth the Gas Money

With the price of gas trending downward, there's no better time to jump in the car, put the top down, and head out for a drive. Here, we have ten itineraries for some of the country's most classic road trips.


What you'll see:
Water, and plenty of it. You might not be able to walk on water, but with this strip of road traveling across the Florida Keys, connected by 42 bridges, you'll feel like you can drive on it. Instead of grass and pines, you'll whiz by seascapes and palm trees. The Overseas Highway is also a good complement to the Maine Coast, as it's the extreme opposite end of Route 1.

Cultural stop: At the Dolphin Research Center in Grassy Key, you can meet dolphins and California sea lions and watch as trainers teach them new tricks—then head to the indoor, air-conditioned theater for educational presentations about the animals.

Roadside attraction: The famous Seven Mile Bridge connects Marathon to Little Duck key, with stunning ocean views the whole way. But if driving past just won't do, here's a good place to park the car and get out to walk or bike. The first Seven Mile Bridge—which was used by trains, not cars, until a hurricane wiped out huge swaths of the tracks in the mid '30s—is now part of the Florida Keys Overseas Heritage Trail and recognized by the National Register of Historic Places. Now closed to most cars, it's a good place to try and catch a sunset.

Grab a bite: A stop at the Holiday Isle Tiki Bar is almost obligatory when traveling through the Florida Keys. It has all of the grass-hut décor you'd expect from a tiki bar, but what sets it apart is that it claims to have invented the Rum Runner cocktail (made with banana liqueur, Meyers rum, brandy, and grenadine). After a couple, you won't care if it's true or not.

Click through to see the full slideshow at the website of the Condé Nast Traveler.

Photo: istockphoto

The Daily Traveler: NYC's Driveless Drive-Ins

Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 1, Brooklyn

Films: There's a loose globe-hopping theme, with each movie in the lineup showcasing a different city.

Lineup: Ferris Bueller's Day Off (July 11), Enter the Dragon (July 18), Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (July 25), 8 Mile (August 1), Roman Holiday(August 8), Rocky (August 15), Vertigo (August 22), and an audience pick (August 29).

Added Value: Brooklyn Radio spins pre-movie music from the featured city; BAMcinématek screens short films before the main feature; and snacks are sold by Blue Marble Ice Cream, Luke’s Lobster, No. 7 Subs, Lizzmonade Brooklyn, and the Brooklyn Bridge Wine Bar.

FYI: Since this movie spot is set right on the water by the Brooklyn Bridge, the gorgeous views of the Manhattan skyline might distract you from the movie.

Click through to see the rest of the slideshow on the website of the Condé Nast Traveler.

Photo courtesy of Brooklyn Bridge Park

The Daily Traveler: Governors Island

I previewed summer events taking place at Governors Island, one of my favorite places in New York City.

Jazz Age Lawn Party
If The Great Gatsby has you primed to take on the Roaring Twenties, this is the place to break out your cloche hats and seersucker suits. With a backdrop of tunes by Michael Arenella and His Dreamland Orchestra, you can shop for vintage clothing, check out the Tin Lizzies in the 1920s car show (which, this year, includes Gatsby's 1925 yellow Rolls Royce), take a sepia-toned photo against a paper moon, and, of course, head to the dance floor and show off your Charleston. Tickets cost $30 ($35 at the door if there's any availability).

Click through to read the full article at the Condé Nast Traveler's website.

Photo © Robert Quinlan / Alamy

The Daily Traveler: New York City's Gardens

As part of the Condé Nast Traveler's New York blog, I profiled 10 gardens.

New York City's Outstanding Urban Gardens

Wave Hill

Wave Hill is an interesting combination of historic home and nature conservatory. The mansion, set on a hill overlooking the Hudson River, has had several VIP residents: Theodore Roosevelt's family rented it for summers, Mark Twain leased it for a time, and Arturo Toscanini lived here from 1942 to 1945. After a two-year renovation, the house reopens this July 6 and 7, but you don't have to wait until then to enjoy the rest of this public garden and cultural center. Nab an adirondack chair on the huge sloping lawn; wander the aquatic, herb or flower gardens; hike a short nature trail; or take pictures of the Palisades from the Italianate pergola. If you're lucky you might spot a proposal or a wedding—Wave Hill is a popular place for both.

Click through to read the rest at the Condé Nast Traveler's website.

Photo courtesy of Wave Hill.

The Daily Traveler: Where to See the Best Fall Foliage

Everything you need to know about Northeast fall foliage: where to find the longest season, the latest start, the most variety, the least crowded destinations, and the most intense color.

Where to See the Best Fall Foliage

The longest season:
New Hampshire's Lakes Region
When to go: Late September through late October
Why go: The secret to finding a lingering foliage season is steering clear of the weather that knocks leaves from their branches. "I would choose those locations away from the wind of the coast and at higher elevations," says Jerry Monkman, co-author of The Colors of Fall Road Trip Guide. This New Hampshire region—which encompasses Lake Winnipesaukee, Squam Lake, Lake Ossipee, Mirror Lake, Newfound Lake and Lake Winnisquam—is protected from the harsh winds of the coast and doesn’t rise more than 600 feet above sea level, giving you the best chance for a long leaf season.
Where to get the best view: Obviously, from the middle of a lake (pick one). Bring a kayak and tone your paddling arms. "You can see red maples along the waterways showing their bright colors on the trees, and then reflected down into the water as well," says Tai Freligh, communications manager for New Hampshire's Division of Travel and Tourism Development.
Insider tip: If boating and hiking feels like too much exertion for a good view, tour the lakes region from a fall foliage train. The Winnipesaukee Scenic Railroad (603-279-5253,, $11 to $15) runs through October 21, and a two-hour round-trip ticket entitles you to a lakeside tour along tracks that were once a part of the Boston & Maine Railroad. Daytime rides come with the option of adding on a "hobo picnic lunch" ($10).

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Photo: NHDTTD/George Murphy